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The Icon Bar: The Playpen: British space tourism
 
  British space tourism
  andrew (23:14 1/7/2008)
  flibble (18:05 3/7/2008)
    Phlamethrower (18:28 3/7/2008)
      andrew (23:13 3/7/2008)
        flibble (11:05 4/7/2008)
          andrew (20:04 5/7/2008)
  Loris (13:39 5/7/2008)
    Phlamethrower (14:07 5/7/2008)
    andrew (20:06 5/7/2008)
      andrew (20:10 5/7/2008)
        ilcook (21:04 5/7/2008)
      Loris (01:08 6/7/2008)
        andrew (12:51 6/7/2008)
          jimnagel (14:25 6/7/2008)
      rich (17:06 8/7/2008)
        andrew (19:24 8/7/2008)
 
Andrew Message #107746, posted by andrew at 23:14, 1/7/2008
HandbagHandbag Boi
Posts: 3439
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7483273.stm

Trouble is there's no space ports in this country nor regulatory systems in place for space tourism. It's not just "physics" that's apparently not being invested in, there's the whole joined-up thinking of what to do with expertise when it does exist.

Buzz Aldrin recently I think summed up how the Americans approach this:

"Please don't ask Americans to let others assume the leadership of human exploration".

[Edited by andrew at 23:14, 1/7/2008]
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Peter Howkins Message #107754, posted by flibble at 18:05, 3/7/2008, in reply to message #107746
flibble

Posts: 865
Virgin Galactic? As far as I'm aware that's about the only space tourist thing that's getting anywhere, run by a british bloke, launched from US, with deisgn by a US bloke.

As for traditional (rocket based) spaceports I think they have to be situated closer to the equator to allow an easier path to orbit, forgot the reason why though.
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Jeffrey Lee Message #107755, posted by Phlamethrower at 18:28, 3/7/2008, in reply to message #107754
PhlamethrowerHot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot stuff

Posts: 15064
As for traditional (rocket based) spaceports I think they have to be situated closer to the equator to allow an easier path to orbit, forgot the reason why though.
IIRC it's because the equator is the fastest moving part of the surface of the planet - so spaceships taking off from there won't need to accelerate as much in order to reach the radial speed required for orbit. (Unless they want to orbit in the opposite direction to the Earth's spin, in which case they're screwed)
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Andrew Message #107756, posted by andrew at 23:13, 3/7/2008, in reply to message #107755
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Posts: 3439
The reason that they never located a spaceport was supposedly distance from settlements which I find hard to believe applies now. The prototype for this was launched from Dartmoor anyway.
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Peter Howkins Message #107758, posted by flibble at 11:05, 4/7/2008, in reply to message #107756
flibble

Posts: 865
The reason that they never located a spaceport was supposedly distance from settlements
Quite important with rocket based launches, see Ariane 5's first launch for an example.

which I find hard to believe applies now.
Yep, non-rocket based launches can use standard airports ... which will be situated where ever is convenient. In the case of Virgin Galactic it's where the things are being built ... and when you're paying 200k a ticket, a free flight to the Mohave desert included in the price doesn't seem an issue wink
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Tony Haines Message #107762, posted by Loris at 13:39, 5/7/2008, in reply to message #107746
madbanHa ha, me mine, mwahahahaha
Posts: 1025
There was a program about the british space research programme in the '70s on Channel 5 last night. Very interesting, and I knew nothing of it - despite being mad for space when I was young. It does say a lot for how the country treats researchers.

Nowadays though I don't think its something thats worth spending a lot of money on. Maybe it'd be worth looking into super-strength materials instead. By developing the first skyhook you could leapfrog miles in front of the competition.
...Of course, you'd still need to build it on the equator.
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Jeffrey Lee Message #107763, posted by Phlamethrower at 14:07, 5/7/2008, in reply to message #107762
PhlamethrowerHot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot Hot stuff

Posts: 15064
We could always do research into rocket engines. Then mount a couple of them on the Earth and use them to tilt it into a different orbit, so we're at the optimal point for space launches tongue
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Andrew Message #107764, posted by andrew at 20:04, 5/7/2008, in reply to message #107758
HandbagHandbag Boi
Posts: 3439
The reason that they never located a spaceport was supposedly distance from settlements
Quite important with rocket based launches, see Ariane 5's first launch for an example.

which I find hard to believe applies now.
Yep, non-rocket based launches can use standard airports ... which will be situated where ever is convenient. In the case of Virgin Galactic it's where the things are being built ... and when you're paying 200k a ticket, a free flight to the Mohave desert included in the price doesn't seem an issue wink
Yes but it wouldn't be British then. The government knows all too well that space tourism is coming and reusable launches are the direction of progress. Hopefully Branson will lobby hard.
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Andrew Message #107765, posted by andrew at 20:06, 5/7/2008, in reply to message #107762
HandbagHandbag Boi
Posts: 3439
There was a program about the british space research programme in the '70s on Channel 5 last night. Very interesting, and I knew nothing of it - despite being mad for space when I was young. It does say a lot for how the country treats researchers.
Damn missed it, can you remember what program it was? In fact much of it was censored and only released in the early 2000s hence the secrecy.



Nowadays though I don't think its something thats worth spending a lot of money on. Maybe it'd be worth looking into super-strength materials instead. By developing the first skyhook you could leapfrog miles in front of the competition.
...Of course, you'd still need to build it on the equator.
Space elevator?
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Andrew Message #107766, posted by andrew at 20:10, 5/7/2008, in reply to message #107765
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Posts: 3439
JL's been watching Dr.Who I see.
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Ian Cook Message #107767, posted by ilcook at 21:04, 5/7/2008, in reply to message #107766
trainResident idiot
Posts: 1068
JL's been watching Dr.Who I see.
Just use a police box to do the moving. wink
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Tony Haines Message #107768, posted by Loris at 01:08, 6/7/2008, in reply to message #107765
madbanHa ha, me mine, mwahahahaha
Posts: 1025
Damn missed it, can you remember what program it was?
It was 'Brits who made the modern world' 3/6: Rockets; Channel 5, 7:30pm, Friday 4th July.
I'm surprised you don't watch that Andrew, given your rampant nationalism.


[Edited by Loris at 01:09, 6/7/2008]
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Andrew Message #107769, posted by andrew at 12:51, 6/7/2008, in reply to message #107768
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Posts: 3439
Thanks. I didnt' realise they were doing a space one but I'll see the repeat for sure.
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Jim Nagel Message #107770, posted by jimnagel at 14:25, 6/7/2008, in reply to message #107769
Member
Posts: 7
[Andrew -- please contact me privately. my email address is in my profile here (or via Archive website's Contacts page). unfortunately, i couldnt find yours! --jim nagel ]
________
--jim (www.archivemag.co.uk)
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Richard Goodwin Message #107798, posted by rich at 17:06, 8/7/2008, in reply to message #107765
Rich
Webmaster
The Icon Bar

Posts: 6780
There was a program about the british space research programme in the '70s on Channel 5 last night. Very interesting, and I knew nothing of it - despite being mad for space when I was young. It does say a lot for how the country treats researchers.
Damn missed it, can you remember what program it was? In fact much of it was censored and only released in the early 2000s hence the secrecy.
Looks like it's a TV version of this:
http://www.iconbar.com/forums/viewthread.php?threadid=9511
...although I've only seen one episode.
________
RichGCheers,
Rich.
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Andrew Message #107804, posted by andrew at 19:24, 8/7/2008, in reply to message #107798
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Posts: 3439
Yes it doesn doesn't it.
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The Icon Bar: The Playpen: British space tourism