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The Icon Bar: General: Where to buy second hand hardware?
 
  Where to buy second hand hardware?
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Justin L Message #117639, posted by myfavheadache at 23:05, 8/5/2011
Member
Posts: 71
The only place I personally know of is ebay and cjemicros and of course apdl, does anyone know other places to purchase acorn hardware/software?

thanks big grin

-justin
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Eric Rucker Message #117640, posted by bhtooefr at 23:33, 8/5/2011, in reply to message #117639
Member
Posts: 336
There's always the comp.sys.acorn.hardware newsgroup, as well. And, if you're in the UK (or at least Europe), there's RISC OS shows.

(I, on the other hand, am in the US... and I managed to find a RiscPC that was in the US, and for sale, via comp.sys.acorn.hardware.)
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Andrew Rawnsley Message #117647, posted by arawnsley at 10:14, 9/5/2011, in reply to message #117639
R-Comp chap
Posts: 470
Cough, we, R-Comp/R-Comp Interactive, have quite a selection available. Obviously our mainstay is new RISC OS / Acorn kit, but people often trade in old stuff too.
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Simon Willcocks Message #117648, posted by Stoppers at 10:43, 9/5/2011, in reply to message #117639
Member
Posts: 278
You might also like to have a look here, especially if you're after 8-bit era stuff.

http://www.stardot.org.uk/forums/
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Steven Gregory Message #117649, posted by thecellartroll at 13:51, 9/5/2011, in reply to message #117647
Member
Posts: 134
Cough, we, R-Comp/R-Comp Interactive, have quite a selection available. Obviously our mainstay is new RISC OS / Acorn kit, but people often trade in old stuff too.
But it is not so easy to find on your website wink
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Andrew Rawnsley Message #117650, posted by arawnsley at 15:20, 9/5/2011, in reply to message #117649
R-Comp chap
Posts: 470
Fair point. To us, RISC OS is a "current" system, not a legacy one. As such, we advertise our current product range (well, when we get around to updating the sites!). I'd expect customers to phone up or email regarding second hand kit, to see if we can help. Like most remaining RISC OS companies, we're a complete supplier/dealer, but we prefer to advertise our more unique products first and foremost smile
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Peter Howkins Message #117651, posted by flibble at 16:15, 9/5/2011, in reply to message #117650
flibble

Posts: 865
I'd expect customers to phone up or email regarding second hand kit, to see if we can help.
Fail internet marketing 101.
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Justin L Message #117652, posted by myfavheadache at 23:28, 9/5/2011, in reply to message #117650
Member
Posts: 71
What legacy hardware do you have andrew? I'm probably looking for another a3010 or something around that because my computer keeps freezing.

cheers!
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Andrew Rawnsley Message #117655, posted by arawnsley at 10:35, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117652
R-Comp chap
Posts: 470
Don't have much below A7000/RiscPC era, to be honest. Most people don't want to go any slower than that because the lower end machines become borderline unusable these days (see thread about the A5000 elsewhere on iconbar). The A5k is 30Mhz, the A3010 is 8Mhz, so things go do proportionally. At the A3010 end, really you're talking about pre-Arm3 games, and no hard drive. Even then, 85%+ of the old games will run on an ARM610 RPC (esp with GameOn). Or use A310emu on a more modern machine to get compatibility with the ARM2 era - some games didn't even like RO3.1 in the A3010!
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vanpeebles Message #117661, posted by vanpeebles at 12:00, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117655
Member
Posts: 198
It's a shame the scene seems to take a dislike to the older machines. To me RO3.1 was the golden days and the A3010 is still a great machine to potter about with old Acorn stuff. My alpha A5000 is super quick for 3.1 based work.

The period that the vast majority of none Acorn owners remember is quickly being forgtten by active Acorn users which is a shame because it could have a great retro scene.

[Edited by vanpeebles at 12:03, 10/5/2011]
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Andrew Rawnsley Message #117662, posted by arawnsley at 12:35, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117661
R-Comp chap
Posts: 470
But, sadly, this is why a lot of RISC OS dev flounderd. Too many people wanted everything to run on a 2Mb A3010, and so software dev tailed off.

There's a two edged sword here - people wonder why there's on a few programs that take advantage of the speed of the Iyonix or RISCube or ARMini, but then people still want the A3010s to keep going! I'm sure you see the dilema.

I think we all remember the "golden days", but really, is there such a thing as "3.1 based work" when practically every program worked on 3.5 (RiscPC) in higher resolutions and colours?

I'm not trying to forget the past, but the RiscPC is now 17 years old itself, so I reckon that qualifies for retro too wink
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vanpeebles Message #117665, posted by vanpeebles at 13:26, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117662
Member
Posts: 198
By work I used the term very loosely smile Basic text and picture editing but mainly gaming, for none Acorn specific tasks I'd just use a PC or Mac.

If too many people wanted stuff to run on the old spec then maybe there was still a market there for them?
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Andrew Rawnsley Message #117666, posted by arawnsley at 13:45, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117665
R-Comp chap
Posts: 470
(tongue in cheek) there's certainly a market for a video or digital photo editing system that runs in 2Mb on an 8Mhz machine - that'd imply some *impressively* optimized code (grin). That's the dichotomy, if you follow - between the kind of apps people want / will pay for, and the legacy hardware.

I'm not saying there's a right answer here, but Acorn definately got the balance wrong between supporting the past and encouraging forward upgrading, at least as far as their balance sheet was ultimately concerned wink


Also, it is probably worth say explicitly... whilst it is fun to hack around on A3000s and the like, we'd prefer to ease the userbase forwards, so that they can see the current crop of software too - the ultimate goal has to be to get such users "back in the fold" as far as current RISC OS software and hardware are concerned. If a RiscPC can run their old stuff, and most newer apps too, for a low/fair price, then that's gotta be good, right?

[Edited by arawnsley at 13:48, 10/5/2011]
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vanpeebles Message #117667, posted by vanpeebles at 14:15, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117666
Member
Posts: 198
Is there a market for video editing on a new RO because in terms of hardware and software other systems have blown that market away a long time ago? The days of the system being a viable alternative to other computers are long gone.

I've never felt the need to progress beyond a SA RO4 RiscPC because the new hardware (and baffling RO versions) offers nothing worthwhile for the price. I can't think of any current software I'd want to run on a new ARMini(or similar) that couldn't be done far better, easier and cheaper elsewhere.

Just out of interest how did you see the Acorn balance?
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Justin L Message #117671, posted by myfavheadache at 15:17, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117665
Member
Posts: 71
Well I only use my Acorn for gaming, it's cheaper than beefing up an Amiga 1200, I got a 4MB expansion for my A3010 and it only cost me £20, while my 4MB expansion for my A1200 cost me £55! and the arc always run so much smoother. I'm not particuarly interested getting it online, but I suppose that would be kinda funky if I did. Just looking for a reliable machine thats gonna run for a few years at least! I'm beginning to hate losing these bids! lol

Hey Andrew, let me know if you get anything like that in stock?

thanks smile
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Steven Gregory Message #117673, posted by thecellartroll at 16:29, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117667
Member
Posts: 134
Is there a market for video editing on a new RO because in terms of hardware and software other systems have blown that market away a long time ago?
Most definitely yes there is. It may be a small market (maybe just me) but although everyone and his dog has been obsessed with getting the Beagleboard to play video not as much work has been done on encoding it, especially in realtime. A small board like the beagle which could manage 720p video capture from a composite source would be great.

Now, RISC OS, believe it or not, is the easiest OS to get a working system going on the Beagle so if someone were to write drivers for something like EasyCap and then a ffmpeg type module for encoding the video and had it optimised to do a decent job then I think you'd see people take RISC OS seriously for that.

Alas I might be the only person interested and I don't have the programming skills so it is likely that it will never happen.

With regards to older machines, get a 4mb A3010. The green keys were awesome, you get built in 9-pin joystick sockets and you can still get a hard drive inside if you are lucky enough to find the interface. I miss my A3010 smile
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vanpeebles Message #117674, posted by vanpeebles at 16:50, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117673
Member
Posts: 198
I still have my A3010 that I've owned from new smile
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Justin L Message #117676, posted by myfavheadache at 22:13, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117674
Member
Posts: 71
I still have my A3010 that I've owned from new smile
I recognise your screename from the Acorn gaming videos on youtube, subscribed and everything, Love your channel mate smile
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vanpeebles Message #117677, posted by vanpeebles at 22:20, 10/5/2011, in reply to message #117676
Member
Posts: 198
Most kind! smile
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Chris Evans Message #117749, posted by CJE at 16:46, 16/5/2011, in reply to message #117674
CJE Micros chap
Posts: 198
If it isn't the mezzanine version but the ARM250 did you realise it contains what is arguably the first ever SoC (System on a Chip)?
Acorn were ahead in a number of ways!
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Trevor Johnson Message #117753, posted by trevj at 21:26, 16/5/2011, in reply to message #117749
Member
Posts: 660
[...] first ever SoC [...]
Sophie Wilson mentioned that too, during her talk at this year's South West show. Does anyone have any old press coverage of this technical achievement?

I think it wouldn't be unreasonable to include it in Wikipedia's System-on-a-chip article... but such a claim needs to be verifiable.
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qUE Message #117754, posted by qUE at 03:16, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117753
qUE

Posts: 170
[...] first ever SoC [...]
Sophie Wilson mentioned that too, during her talk at this year's South West show. Does anyone have any old press coverage of this technical achievement?

I think it wouldn't be unreasonable to include it in Wikipedia's System-on-a-chip article... but such a claim needs to be verifiable.
Hmm don't quote me on this, but for it to be classed as a SoC it probably needs a flash area.
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Rob Kendrick Message #117755, posted by nunfetishist at 09:19, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117754
nunfetishist
Exposing morons since 1981

Posts: 486
Hmm don't quote me on this, but for it to be classed as a SoC it probably needs a flash area.
Don't worry, we won't quote you on it, because you're wrong smile
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VinceH Message #117756, posted by VincceH at 11:05, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117755
VincceH
Lowering the tone since the dawn of time

Posts: 1591
Hmm don't quote me on this, but for it to be classed as a SoC it probably needs a flash area.
Don't worry, we won't quote you on it, because you're wrong smile
Except that you just did. tongue
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Tom Walker Message #117757, posted by TomWalker at 12:09, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117753
Member
Posts: 25
[...] first ever SoC [...]
Sophie Wilson mentioned that too, during her talk at this year's South West show. Does anyone have any old press coverage of this technical achievement?

I think it wouldn't be unreasonable to include it in Wikipedia's System-on-a-chip article... but such a claim needs to be verifiable.
I think the C&T F8680 (8086 clone + XT hardware + CGA - Nov 1991?) predates ARM250.
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Rob Kendrick Message #117758, posted by nunfetishist at 12:16, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117757
nunfetishist
Exposing morons since 1981

Posts: 486
I think the C&T F8680 (8086 clone + XT hardware + CGA - Nov 1991?) predates ARM250.
Don't let facts cloud an aledged Acorn first! smile

Depending on where you draw the SoC line, there were probably quite a few things that came along before the ARM250.
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qUE Message #117759, posted by qUE at 19:11, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117755
qUE

Posts: 170
Hmm don't quote me on this, but for it to be classed as a SoC it probably needs a flash area.
Don't worry, we won't quote you on it, because you're wrong smile
I think you're confusing me with someone else, I'm never not wrong!
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Trevor Johnson Message #117760, posted by trevj at 22:01, 17/5/2011, in reply to message #117758
Member
Posts: 660
but such a claim needs to be verifiable.
I think the C&T F8680 (8086 clone + XT hardware + CGA - Nov 1991?) predates ARM250.
Don't let facts cloud an aledged Acorn first! smile

Depending on where you draw the SoC line, there were probably quite a few things that came along before the ARM250.
Oh well, Wikipedia will probably settle on "one of the first", if there are citable references to back it up! (And refs for previous ones too, of course.)

Any takers? Just stick 'em on the talk page and someone will work them into the article.
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Trevor Johnson Message #117807, posted by trevj at 15:39, 24/5/2011, in reply to message #117758
Member
Posts: 660
OK, here's a quote from the Inquirer:
"We didn't know it was a first, and the world didn't know it was a first. It was a long way before anyone was talking about systems-on-a-chip," said Wilson.
Are you saying it's bullshit? It could be included in the Wikipedia article as a claimed first (perhaps after being discussed on the talk page).
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Rob Kendrick Message #117808, posted by nunfetishist at 16:57, 24/5/2011, in reply to message #117807
nunfetishist
Exposing morons since 1981

Posts: 486
OK, here's a quote from the Inquirer:
"We didn't know it was a first, and the world didn't know it was a first. It was a long way before anyone was talking about systems-on-a-chip," said Wilson.
Are you saying it's bullshit? It could be included in the Wikipedia article as a claimed first (perhaps after being discussed on the talk page).
I'm saying it depends where you place the posts. "SoC" is such a vague and varied term, "first SoC" doesn't make much sense.

Do microcontrollers count? (They're whole systems, after all.) Does the RAM need to be included? Any ROM/Flash? Does it have to have video? (And thus excluding half of Marvell's SoCs that are so popular in NASes). Etc.
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The Icon Bar: General: Where to buy second hand hardware?